Health And Nutrition

Simular to the man who defined love as “not beating your wife,” nutrition is as much a matter of what not to do as what is right.
Nutrition is the science of keeping the body properly fueled with the correct foods.
Although eating should also entail the idea of pleasure, the Main importance of food is to keep the body cells healthy. A cell cannot distinguish whether the protein it receives came from filet mignon or from beef stew; neither can the cell appreciate the gastronomic artistry of a four-layer cake piled high with frosting. In fact, if the cell could speak our language, it would probably shout, “For your health’s sake, stop choking me with all those sugars and starches and send me more protein. It’s not carbohydrates that make me happy, it’s amino acids!”
Because our cells were created in the understanding of the “do’s and don’t’s” of good nutrition, it is about time some basis of understand­ing is reached between the mind that selects and puts together the food and the cell for whom the food is intended. Most of us would have nothing but the most genuine compassion for a child before whom anunknowing mother would place a meal of ham, fried potatoes and strong espresso. Yet the things we do to our cells nutritionally make this gross ignorance look humane by comparison!
Proper nutrition is not as dreary a prospect as I once heard it defined by one teen-ager to another. “Nutrition,” said the all-know­ing teenager, “means giving up everything you like—sodas and hot dogs and stuff—and cramming down spinach and carrots.”
Quite the opposite, nutrition can be a exciting study. And certainly it should be one of great interest to everyone, since it is so personal. I cannot eat for you; that is one function each one of us must carry out for himself. Although we may have to depend upon other people to grow our food and to cook it, getting that food to the body cells—its ultimate goal—is something no one else can do for us. That is why it is neccessary for everyone to have at least an rudimentary knowledge of what constitutes good nutrition. Eating is far more than grabbing a bite to quiet a growling stomach. Like everything else, nutrition has its commonsense side – and your health hinges on it!
The greatest way to simplify a complex subject is to introduce it to you through its Key characters. Simply, these are proteins (amino acids), carbohydrates (sugars and starches) and fats which, in turn, reduce to vitamins and minerals.
Water is also an essential component of nutrition, although you may be accustomed to thinking of it as only something to appease thirst, or to fill a bathtub! In fact, it is the most important element of the puzzle. Consider this: a healthy person can live for up to 8 weeks without food but only 3-5 days without drinking water

Coffee: Friend Or Foe

The Questions
There may be no flashing neon lights reminding you about the side effects of drinking coffee, but we all know they exist. Because coffee comes from the seeds of Coffea plant’s berries, and how could something that comes from berries be harmful? After all, coffee is what kick-starts every morning and gets us working. But can you sip on your coffee with absolutely no concern about its side effects? Do you ever wonder which is better, regular systematic consumption of coffee or avoiding habituation completely? Finally, does coffee really improve athletic performance? If these questions have been burning in the back of your mind, then you should read on.

What is Caffeine Withdrawal?
Against popular belief, scientific literature tells us that there is no physical harm in drinking coffee. In fact, moderate consumption can benefit your body. There’s one catch: this positive effect is not caffeine’s work, but rather the coffee itself. Caffeine can be bad for you, and it all depends on your own physiology. Some people experience headaches, increased heart rate, tremors, or even performance impairment. On top of that, coffee has addictive characteristics and caffeine intoxication that comes from excessive intake can cause withdrawal symptoms, such as fatigue, headache, and difficulty focusing. The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) now categorizes caffeine withdrawal as a mental disorder, noting that many people are addicted to the process of coffee consumption.

The Benefits
Yet, there is plenty of scientific evidence that caffeine ups the endurance of the athlete via a type of fatigue resistance or an altered perception of effort. Recent studies recommend that consumption be kept modest, at a range of 1-3mg/kg BM or 70 to 150 milligrams caffeine before or during exercise. More is not necessarily better in the case of caffeine, and everyone’s body reacts differently to caffeine. So, it’s best to stay within the recommended range and keep track of your own consumption and your body’s reaction.

Should You Keep Drinking?
Finally, can someone adapt to caffeine consumption, dulling the positive effects of caffeine on athletic performance? There still needs to be research done on caffeine, athletics, and their relationship. However, it seems that the most recent studies are recommending coffee drinkers to continue their usage schedules rather than risk withdrawal symptoms. Some even state that the positive effects of caffeine on athletic performance increases with habituation, with less risk of the negative effects such as heart rate increase, tremors, and irritability. From this, we can conclude that a moderate caffeine schedule as part of a balanced diet is ideal.

As you can see, coffee consumption is perfectly fine for most people. The complexity comes from individual differences and the habit-forming nature of caffeine. What is definite is that recognizing that coffee is not a substitute for good-quality sleep and being aware of potential side effects of caffeine withdrawal is vital for any user.

10 Steps To Healthy Eating

There seems to be far too much confusion around what healthy eating really is and how to do it. Everywhere you look there are food products being portrayed as �nutritious� when clearly they aren’t, we have health organisations in Australia promoting the wrong message and our sports role models and health experts promoting foods which are still unhealthy � it’s any wonder society is sicker than ever before.

Did you know that 60%+ of Australians are overweight or obese and that the main cause of death is cardiovascular disease? There appears to be a correlation between the increase in refined, fried and fatty foods and the rise in weight gain.

WHAT IS HEALTHY EATING?
Healthy eating is eating foods which infuse the digestive system with nutrients which are used to rebuild and repair tissue as well as give the body an abundance of energy. For the digestive system to work at optimal levels it needs to be able to secrete, digest, absorb and defecate regularly.

Foods which are ideal for the digestive system are foods which haven’t been tampered with and are still alive! Our body is alive, therefore we need to eat alive foods such as leafy greens, vegetables and fruits, as well as nuts, seeds, legumes and wholegrains. These foods are cleansing, nutrient-rich and give us the most energy.

WHAT ISN’T HEALTHY EATING?
Eating foods which are highly processed, refined (wheat and sugar), fatty and fried, tampered with etc� are not good for us in large doses. The body is pretty powerful and strong so it can handle small amounts of acidic foods such as these, but in large doses on a regular basis can have detrimental effects.

When the body’s requirements aren’t being met or the digestive processes aren’t working properly, this is met with poor performance which can lead to sickness, then to disease and ultimately cancer.

If you’re lacking in energy and your body is feeling sluggish then it’s telling you it needs more nutrients.

BENEFITS OF HEALTHY EATING:
Energy & Motivation: the number 1 reason people eat healthily is because of the surge in energy and motivation! When the body is getting exactly what it needs to run at optimal levels this is the result � lots and lots of energy and motivation!

Ideal weight: when the body isn’t being filled up with dead foods it can begin to release the excess fat in its adipose tissue which can build up when too much refined sugar, bad fats and refined carbohydrates are consumed.

Clear mind: That cloudiness you may be experiencing disappears completely. You can think more clearly and make better decisions because your brain is finally operating at the level it’s meant to be on.

Productivity: Generally people who are healthier become more productive because they aren’t tired, lowly and cloudy in the mind, they are alive again and want to do more.

Awake: Do you wake up tired each morning and by 3pm you’re reaching for another coffee? Eating lots of dead foods makes you tired because they have no energy in them. Healthy foods are full of nutrients which turn into energy and keep you awake.

Happiness: Dead foods are acidic and have a toxic effect on the body which can cause deformity in our cells, cause havoc on our hormones and leave us feeling pretty miserable and out of sorts. Eating alive foods reverses these effects and helps you feel happy again.

Feeling better about yourself: How happy are you really when you’re tired all the time, cloudy minded, unmotivated, feeling low and sick on a regular basis? Not very� When you lead a healthier lifestyle you feel FANTASTIC and ALIVE again.

Strong immunity: Eating alive nutritious foods keeps your immune system strong which means your internal army (white blood cells) are able to destroy viruses, bacteria, fungi and stop infections from occurring.

Live a long healthy life: Many fear living out the last years of their life attached to a machine or bedbound in pain. You have a choice to live a long healthy life and dying of �old age� would certainly be a better way to go.

10 STEPS TO HEALTHY EATING:

Eating a minimum of 5 serves of veggies: this is the minimum daily intake. Choose vegetables such as zucchini, broccoli, bok choy, capsicum, carrot, spinach, celery etc�

Eating a minimum of 2 serves of fruit: this is the minimum daily intake, fruit is high in fibre, contains water soluble nutrients and has a cleansing effect on your bowel.

Eat good oils high in Omega 3: such as avocados, flax seed oil, fish oil. All of which are great for your heart, skin and joints.

Have a few meat free days a week: excess meat in the diet is highly acidic for the body and takes a lot of energy to break down � giving your body a rest a few times a week gives the body time to balance out the acidity.

Reduce your intake of gluten containing foods by 50%: gluten has a glue like effect on the digestive system and is very harsh and difficult to digest.

Reduce your intake of refined sugar: by 50% as refined sugar is very toxic to your body and assists with weight gain.

Reduce your intake of fried & fatty foods: by 50% as fried and fatty foods increase your risk of cardiovascular disease, cause disturbances within the digestive tract and assist with weight gain.

Drink 2 litres of water a day: which helps you stay hydrated, energised and assists with digestion of food.

Not drink whilst eating: as this dilutes the digestive juices � best to wait 30-45min after large meals.

Try alternatives to cows milk: cows milk can be very mucus forming and hard to digest, so mixing it up a little by using other milks such as rice, oat, almond, goat etc� will reduce the build up of mucus.