Handloom – A Special Craft

You might be surprised to observe that those sights and sounds are same across any weaving community across India. Can you believe that every of those groups in distinctive geographical area across India produces a completely unique weave! Be it the well-known Kanchipuram silk, Sungadi, Rasipuram, Thribhuvanam from Tamil Nadu, Mangalgiri, Ikat from Andhra Pradesh, sambalpuri from Odissa, Chanderi from Madhya Pradesh, Banares weaves of Varanasi, Paithanis of Maharashtra to the valuable Patan Patola (the double Ikkat) from Gujarat. Not to mention the particular nature of tribal weaves and silks from the North Eastern States consisting of Assam, Manipur and Meghalaya. The collection that India offers is definitely amazing!

So what is the handloom weave?

A handloom is a easy device used for weaving. In a wooden vertical-shaft loom, the heddles are fixed in vicinity within the shaft. The warp threads pass alternately thru a heddle, and via a area among the heddles (the shed), so that elevating the shaft raises half of the threads (the ones passing thru the heddles), and reducing the shaft lowers the equal threads – the threads passing through the spaces between the heddles stay in area. This when used rather creates the ‘rap’ sound that I stated earlier.

The artwork of handloom weaving essentially entails 3 tiers:

The manufacturing manner of the yarn
The dyeing process
The weaving system

The manufacturing and making of the cotton or silk yarn is an difficult procedure concerning craftsmen who have been working towards and perfecting the art over many centuries and India is taken into consideration to be the arena’s fine handloom hub. Handloom weaving is a community activity positioned in unique businesses across India. Sometimes an entire village’s livelihood centres on handloom weaving and interest has involved households throughout generations.