Taking Proper Nutrition During Pregnancy

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists advises women to increase their nutrition during pregnancy. It recommends increasing their usual food servings and taking variety from the four fundamental food groups.

The Standard Diet

The standard diet for pregnancy nutrition consists of about four or more servings of fresh fruits and vegetables, 4 or more servings of enriched cereal, bread, and whole grains, 4 or more servings of dairy products and milk, and 3 or more servings of protein-rich foods such as dried beans, peas, and pulses.

Iron

You need lots of iron for good nourishment. As per the National Research Council, the requirement of iron is not possible to be met solely by natural food, especially in the later pregnancy stages. The increment in iron requirement is due to fetal demand as well as the increment in the volume of your own blood by 30 per cent. Iron is vital for the production of red blood corpuscles.

If you do not take adequate iron, the fetus will suck its supply from you and you will end up with anemia and extreme exhaustion. Its good to take iron supplements after consulting your doctor.

Folic Acid

Your requirement for folic acid increases during pregnancy. In fact, you should start taking enough folic acid well before you plan to get pregnant to prevent deficiency. But, not all doctors agree on the intake of folate supplements for every woman. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) panel found inadequate proof to declare that all pregnant women should take folate supplements.

Folate is found naturally in green leafy vegetables, peas, and dried beans. There is enough evidence that shows that folic acid is important for the prevention of neural tube disorders, like spinal bifida. Besides this, this vitamin helps in red blood cell formation.

Nutritional Supplements

As per the report published in June 1990 by IOM, supplements do not help much in providing nourishment. Doctors all over the world agree that, almost all the nutrients can be obtained through a balanced diet. Except for iron, which poses a double requirement during pregnancy, you need not depend on nutritional supplements for healthy nutrition during pregnancy. Only in cases of deficiencies, do doctors recommend supplements, out of which, the common ones are those containing folic acid and calcium.

Try to gather more and more knowledge about pregnancy by surfing the internet and visiting various informational websites. Keep yourself well informed by reading books and articles that talk about nutrition during pregnancy.

Be Healthy With Correct Nutrition Guide

A healthy diet is beneficial for everybody. It is important to take good care of your body and if you eat well, you will certainly feel the difference. A nutritionally balanced diet can be enjoyable and interesting.

What is Nutrition?

Nutrition is all about eating the right foods to nourish the body and keep it functioning and developing well. Nutrients are the substances found in these foods which your body uses and can be broken down into macronutrients and micronutrients. Macronutrients include fats, proteins, water, carbohydrates and some minerals. Micronutrients are vitamins and some minerals. Your body requires more macronutrients but both are important.

For optimum health and performance, the body needs proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals and water. It is also important to eat regular meals to provide ongoing fuel and energy.

What Foods Should You Eat?

The most important thing in a healthy diet is balance. A good selection of fresh fruits and vegetables, proteins and grains is good for you. Some examples of nutritionally rich foods include meat, fish, nuts, beans, fresh fruit and leafy vegetables. Wholegrain foods contain more nutrients than their processed counterparts. Wholemeal bread, for instance, is tastier than white bread and is also healthier.

What Happens if Your Diet is Nutritionally Poor?

Eating a healthy, balanced diet reduces the risk of diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and cancer. A bad diet can also cause lethargy, obesity or spots. A nutritionally balanced diet can help you maintain a normal weight, which helps your overall health.

Not having the time to plan meals or not being able to cook is no excuse for poor nutrition. You can make a batch of food and freeze or refrigerate it or you can have food or ingredients delivered to your door. It can be fun to experiment with cooking and you will get better results if you use fresh ingredients. You will also know exactly what goes into your food as a lot of pre-prepared meals contain high levels of fats, salt or sugar.

Because a good diet ought to be balanced, you can still have treats sometimes. You should not deprive yourself completely of your favorite foods, so the occasional slice of apple pie or bowl of ice cream is fine. You can choose your foods and make substitutions when appropriate. You could perhaps try baking or grilling your food rather than frying it. Eating less saturated fat will keep your blood cholesterol down.

It might be a good idea to take vitamin and mineral supplements to ensure you are getting everything your body needs. The simplest way to do this is to get combined supplements and take one a day. Supplements are to be used in addition to a nutritionally balanced diet, not instead of it.

Exercise is as important as nutrition to keep the body healthy. If you are eating healthily, you will find you have plenty of energy for physical exercise, in whatever form you choose.

Your body gets used to a new way of eating within a few weeks so you will find you don’t miss eating junk foods if you used to eat a lot. A nutritionally balanced diet is essential to maintain overall health and keep you looking and feeling your best.

School Nutrition Laws Confuse Fundraising Groups

Do you know the laws of your regarding foods allowed on High School campuses for fundraising purposes? Chances are that you have no idea. The average person having no idea really isn’t a surprise. What is a surprise is that most teachers, coaches and even administrators aren’t entirely clear on what is allowed and what isn’t as they search for healthy fundraising solutions.

The reason for this is that we are in the midst of great change in schools districts across the country. Laws are being passed at the state level as you read this mandating what may and may not be present in terms of food. Adding to the confusion, School districts have individual specific nutrition or “wellness” policies, which are often slightly different than state policies. Additionally, there are USDA policies which are also slightly different. If you’re shaking your head in confusion, you’re not alone.

The good news in all of this is that things are getting better. Whereas candy and junk food has been pervasive on High School campuses for years, it will soon be a thing of the past as schools seek healthy fundraising solutions. The difficult aspect for teachers, coaches and other school leaders is running the nutrition gauntlet as they seek out direct sales food fundraising products which are allowed in their states.

The first thing to do along this path is to directly seek out information applicable to you. Some good websites as you seek information are: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/, http://www.schoolnutrition.org/, http://www.actionforhealthykids.org/, and http://www.healthyfundraisingsolutions.com/

Next you’ll need to learn certain terms like FMNV, or Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value. Examples of these foods are candy and other junk food. These are specifically being banned in state after state. As you research, you’ll find the most commonly prescribed criteria that foods on campus must meet are that they be: less than 35% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat, and less than 200 calories. These are USDA guidelines. However, some states regulations differ slightly. In Nevada, food items must be: less than 30% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat, less than 600 mg sodium and less than 1.5 or 2.2. oz, depending on type of food. In California, it’s less than 35% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat and less than 250 calories